Avoid these MISTAKES to get a dad bod

The self-improvement movement encourages men to better themselves – this is all wrong as we will never be happy because we will never reach our full potential.

This includes the negative expectation to stay physically healthy and go to the gym.  This is not good as it means we are trying to be someone that we are not.

Women have the fat acceptance movement, its time for men to react and be proud of their slobby ways too!

Image provided by fat shaming magazine – Men’s Health

Therefore in this article, I give some advice to avoid a number of mistakes and keep the dad bod alive.

Nutrition

From data I pulled from the first result of a Google search show that NEARLY half of children are obese, therefore if you set a bad example by eating healthy and exercising your child will think this is normal behaviour.

Round figures as illustrated in the diagram below illustrate that the less junk food your child eats the more likely they will be different and get picked on

Just ask yourself do you want to be an enabler of your own child’s bullying?  Then be aware to make special effort to keep them average. Continue reading “Avoid these MISTAKES to get a dad bod”

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Reasons Project Managers should read history

There are numerous writings that detail the importance of why history matters, these usually appeal on the level of studying human behaviour, achievement, and understanding where we come from.  Perhaps idealistic, there is a belief that by knowing the past, the same mistakes can be avoided in future.

History is valued in political and management literature from a leadership perspective.  For the project professional, the past should be analysed beyond this; if a Project Manager reads history they will find they interpret events from a project perspective.

Here are six reasons Project Managers should read history:

Continue reading “Reasons Project Managers should read history”

Investing in the stock market for the first time: a retrospective (Part 2)

This is the second part of my experience of my first year investing in the stock market.  Please read Part One first.

Being a foreign investor

I had no clue how things worked being a foreign investor, could it be done?  The answer is yes. The great thing about the Internet is that it has opened everything up so that even someone as clueless as myself can own a share in companies all over the world.

I can’t comment on companies beyond the UK and US, but for my US shares, I just had to sign some additional forms declaring my legitimacy for receipt of dividends.

Another tip to consider is to always take into consideration the current exchange rate, I have overestimated how many shares I can buy due to miscalculations.
Continue reading “Investing in the stock market for the first time: a retrospective (Part 2)”

Investing in the stock market for the first time: a retrospective (Part 1)

Investing in the stock market: the risk-averse saver

I have always been a good saver and back in the pre-recession days (of 2007) I enjoyed the benefits of getting a whopping 6% interest.  Not bad for low/no risk investment.

But since the crash, rates have never recovered and you are lucky to get a saver that offers 1.5 percent.  I felt like I was being punished for being a saver – watching my money gradually lose value against the rate of inflation.  I decided rather than blaming the system, I should start pursuing other options.

The stock market always made me feel a touch cautious, the fact that money I invested – my hard earned money, could be less or even disappear completely was daunting.

The media didn’t help either, quick to report when the share prices dropped (but not so much when it recovered) and trading websites were overloaded with ‘expert’ analysts using confusing terminology saying why a stock was a poor investment, it all seemed confusing.

I decided after sitting on the fence to make a relatively small investment that would not impact my life if things were to go bad.  And with that, I made the jump into the world of investing.

Continue reading “Investing in the stock market for the first time: a retrospective (Part 1)”

120kg squat (Part 2)

Less than a week after I talked about my effort to do a  120kg squat, for one proper rep (i.e not cheating by quarter squatting)   I achieved it! It took months and much longer than expected but I did it!

Despite going to the gym for over 15 years it was one of those moments where I was tested and realised I still have much to learn.

120-squat

Continue reading “120kg squat (Part 2)”

Perfect father

If I have not said enough already, last year I became a father.

It took a while to really get back to focusing on my goals.  Time is tight and there is the obvious distraction (i.e. a baby) but so far its all good, I feel motivated than ever and finding ways to make it work.

When I was reviewing my progress my wife asked the usual “What are you writing about?” type question, so I gave the standard answer about recording recent progress against my goals.

“Okay… do you have any family goals?”

I sat in silence for a moment… then I simply said “No”

It wasn’t really a difficult question I just hadn’t put in any thought into being a better father.  When I really thought about it there was so many things I could do. Continue reading “Perfect father”

Develop a Gorilla grip and conquer the monkey bars

Are you taking part in Tough Mudder, Spartan or another obstacle course race?

You are probably aware that a mainstay feature of these races is the monkey bars!  Some people do this effortlessly but if you are anything like me then you probably have found them a struggle!

Keep trying, keep failing:

I have put a lot of effort into trying to improve my upper body strength to conquer this pretty simple obstacle – I did pull-ups, lifted heavy weights and would even jump in play parks and use those monkey bars (when kids weren’t around of course) and yet it still was the most excruciating pain going across something that was a measly three metres at best.

It became something I always dreaded when I was obstacle racing as I knew I was bound to come off and have to do a penalty.

By luck, I was having a walk with the family around a local beauty spot where it had a ‘trim trail’ which I took great pleasure in showing off.  Then I got to the monkey bars.  I felt that old dread but as I was only messing around I thought I might as well give it a go.

Much to my surprise, I worked my way across the bars with ease first time.  I wasn’t warmed up and I was probably about two stone heavier than when I last went across the bars in the peak of my OCR career.

So how did I get the strength to conquer the bars with so little effort? Continue reading “Develop a Gorilla grip and conquer the monkey bars”

Why do you want more money?

In my last post I discussed about keeping goals simple.  A major part of this is how important it is to apply a metric to any goals that you set so that there is room for measurement as you progress.

This got me thinking about a goal that is very easy to apply a metric to that I would say 99.9% of people in the self-improvement field possess.  Of  course, I’m talking about –

Money

Money goals come in many forms:

  • To get a job that earns ‘X’.
  • Be a millionaire.
  • Make ‘X’ amount a month in passive income.
  • I want to be rich.
  • I want to be debt free.
  • Increase my business profit.

Some of these read better than others, applying a metric is better than a vague aspirational statement saying –  “I want to be a millionaire” is worthless, as it is nothing but a dream without any clear plans in place or a clear why you want to achieve that goal. Continue reading “Why do you want more money?”

How to keep your goals simple

The Internet really over complicates goal setting.

If it is not recommending the ‘best’ app to record your goals, it offers a platitude of content at the users’ disposal.  Many a cunning person has exploited this, as if by applying a monetary value their advice is seen more impactful, when it is just another piece of the same old regurgitated advice from across the globe.

Here is how it should be:

  1. Choose how you want to record your goals.
  2. Come up with what you want to achieve.
  3. Make a plan for it and put this into practice.
  4. (After much effort and habit) get a result.

Continue reading “How to keep your goals simple”

Bubbles

“Everybody is talking about this issue, why are they not doing anything about it?”

Being an environmentalist, this was something I heard all the time at events like this.

My main issue with this statement is the assumption from the individual that environmental sustainability is everyone’s main priority.  The reason they (i.e. the politicians) were not doing anything about ‘it’ was the simple fact that everybody wasn’t talking about this issue (i.e. the environment).

The environmentalist can be quick to judge those not fully behind the cause as selfish, but humans are more complicated than that, with a lack of appreciation that the average man on the street has other conflicting interests and priorities such as work, health, and their families.

Continue reading “Bubbles”