The First Five Minutes

I was under pressure to really get my training down for Spartan.  I decided to incorporate runs in to and from work.  At the time I worked at the library so could not always be be bothered after a day on my feet.

Running after work to get home is the perfect motivation – much better than recreational runs.  My mind knows I have to keep running if I want to get home as early as possible.

I also was either a great runner, or public transport in the UK is terrible because I found my journey’s home were a lot quicker than being on the bus.

My first time out running, I was doing a shift at a library that was about 9km away from home.  My colleagues were reasonable impressed that I was running home from work and probably thinking I was slightly mental.

With a backpack full of library books I began running down the road – I had not even covered 50 metres when my legs felt the pressure from the excess weight I was carrying.

The negative voice in my head said “It’s not possible, you’re taking too much on…”

I knew that my colleagues were not far behind, one was waiting for the bus.  Then the voice in my head that was made up of my ego kicked in “You don’t want them thinking your a quitter!”

So I continued…

I was soon out of sight from my colleagues, where I could easily have switched to walking, there was no one around to judge me…

Then my ego kicked my laziness right in the balls  “You’re not going to quit on me are you?  Keep on!  Keep moving forward… actually you should be going faster you pussy!”

So I pushed on, in what was a difficult first five minutes.  I realised I was halfway to my destination, after that difficult start – I had gone into the day dream run mode and completely forgot about the pain.

My day dreams help me on my runs, I think about smashing personal bests, what I can do better in the gym and how I can improve my life.  These positive thoughts must produce endorphins that make me relax on runs.

My lungs burnt slightly and there were a load of people watching a rugby game – “You going to make those people think you haven’t got what it takes.  Don’t you dare QUIT on me!”

As I approached  my end target, I alternated between sprints and a careful jog.  I got home 10 minutes earlier than I aimed for.

I learnt three things:

  1. The voice of motivation in my head sounds like an American Football coach from a Hollywood film.
  2. The first five minutes make all the difference, whether to continue or whether to quit.
  3. Despite the excess weight in my bag I did not use this as an excuse and when it came down to it, it barely mattered.

brock

In reflection how many times had I gone to the gym tired but pulled through to have an amazing session.

Or how about the time I sat down at a test – looked blankly at the questions, clueless what to do.  Until I thought for five minutes gathering my thoughts and ideas – proceeding to write non-stop for three hours until my hand feel like it’s fit to fall off.

Get through the first five minutes and we can do anything…

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